Saturday, February 25, 2017

Google will help media to find malicious comments on articles

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Google from Alphabet Inc and its subsidiary Jigsaw launched new technology on Thursday to help online media and platforms identify abusive comments on their websites. 

The technology, called Perspective, will review comments and assign them a note based on how similar they are to messages that people said were "toxic" or that would make them leave a conversation.

The tool was tested in the New York Times and companies hope to extend it to other media such as The Guardian and The Economist as well as Internet sites.

"Media organizations want to encourage participation and discussion about their content, but they find that seeing millions of comments to find abusers or malicious people takes a lot of money, work and time. As a result, many sites have closed their sections Of comments, "wrote Jared Cohen, president of Jigsaw, on a blog.

Perspective examined hundreds of thousands of comments that had been rated offensive by supervisors to learn how to identify potentially abusive language.

CJ Adams, Jigsaw product manager, said the company was open to bringing technology to all platforms, without specifying whether that included networks such as Facebook and Twitter, where malicious and abusive comments can be a big headache.

Perspective will not decide what to do with comments that are potentially offensive, in which case it will depend on the medium sending them to their moderators or developing tools to help people understand the impact of what they are writing.

The initiative against such messages follows efforts by Google and Facebook to fight false news in France, Germany and the United States, which was hit hard by criticism during the November presidential vote when it became clear that they had promoted false stories.

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MacDonald Dettwiler buys provider of DigitalGlobe satellite imagery for $ 2.4 billion

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MacDonald Dettwiler and Associates Ltd said on Friday it had agreed to buy US satellite imaging provider DigitalGlobe Inc for about $ 3.1 billion to strengthen its position in the US market. 

Under the agreement, MacDonald Dettwiler and Associates (MDA) will offer $ 17.50 in cash and 0.3132 of its shares for each role of DigitalGlobe. The deal also includes assuming DigitalGlobe's net debt of $ 1.6 billion.

The Canadian MDA technology, used in large and small satellites and ground stations, will help improve DigitalGlobe's services, which will allow the combined company to take steps to extend its leadership in providing satellites and images of the Earth to the Markets.

As part of the deal, which is expected to close in the second half of 2017, MDA shares will be listed on the New York and Toronto stock exchanges.

DigitalGlobe's services are used by companies such as Facebook Inc., Uber Technologies Inc and US defense contractor Harris Corp.

BofA Merrill Lynch is MDA's financial advisor, while PJT Partners and Barclays advise DigitalGolbe.

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Thursday, February 23, 2017

5 things to know before investing in business startups

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According to the Small Business Administration, approximately 500,000 new businesses are started every year in the United States. Because it can be difficult to obtain financing, small-business entrepreneurs often turn to friends, family or acquaintances for funding. If you find yourself with the opportunity to invest in a business startup, tread carefully.

Think about liability, the valuation of the business, your timeline and your exit strategy. Before you even consider taking a partnership or jumping on board, here are some basics to know before investing in a new business.

Beware of the opportunity

It's usually difficult for ordinary Americans to find a private company in which to invest. Unless you're a known local business player and are in-tune with the business community, it's unlikely you'll be approached with an opportunity.

Gregg Landers, managing director of consulting and internal control services at CBIZ MHM, says most small-business investment opportunities come from friends, family or word of mouth. It could be a relative looking to open a restaurant or a friend planning to turn his or her bright idea into a business.

"You have to ask yourself why the opportunity is even available," Landers says. "Usually they are trying to raise money, and it means they probably couldn't get it from a bank. You have to find out the story behind it."
Recommended: 5 Mistake to avoid in business planning 

While it could throw up a red flag, the inability for an entrepreneur or startup to obtain financing isn't necessarily a sign that it's doomed. Business valuation expert and CPA David Coffman of Harrisburg, Pa., says it's tough for startups to obtain financing nowadays. Even new businesses that can show a couple of years' sustainability can have problems if the bank isn't willing to take a risk.

"Even though they want to lend to businesses, they're just very wary. It's just hard for many of them to get financing, so they'll often turn to friends and family for capital," he says.

Understand the structure

Shannon Pratt of Shannon Pratt Valuations in Beaverton, Ore., says potential investors should carefully understand the business structure. It can determine how the IRS and legal system view liabilities and profits. The chances are strong that the firm could fail -- according to the Small Business Administration, approximately 50 percent of small businesses close within the first five years.

Depending on the structure of the business, you could be personally responsible for unpaid bills or liabilities in the event the business fails. Pratt stresses that investors should think carefully about limiting their responsibility and recommends sticking with a limited liability corporation, or LLC. One of the most important attributes of an LLC is that owners are not usually liable for company debts.

"Without forming an LLC, if they go out of business and have liabilities, all of those stakeholders likely have the right to come after you (personally)," Landers says.

Coffman says people often make the mistake of investing in a friend's or family member's business with little more than a handshake. No matter how close a relationship you have, Coffman says drafting official documents and putting things in writing is essential.

"It's often very informal, and there usually isn't a lot of evaluation. If you want to do it properly, you need to have legal documents drawn up," he says.

Shannon Pratt of Shannon Pratt Valuations in Beaverton, Ore., says potential investors should carefully understand the business structure. It can determine how the IRS and legal system view liabilities and profits. The chances are strong that the business could fail -- according to the Small Business Administration, approximately 50 percent of small businesses close within the first five years.

Depending on the structure of the business, you could be personally responsible for unpaid bills or liabilities in the event the business fails. Pratt stresses that investors should think carefully about limiting their accountability and recommends sticking with a limited liability corporation, or LLC. One of the most important attributes of an LLC is that owners are not usually liable for company debts.

"Without forming an LLC, if they go out of business and have liabilities, all of those stakeholders likely have the right to come after you (personally)," Landers says.

Coffman says people often make the mistake of investing in a friend's or family member's business with little more than a handshake. No matter how close a relationship you have, Coffman says drafting official documents and putting things in writing is essential.

"It's often very informal, and there usually isn't a lot of evaluation. If you want to do it properly, you need to have legal documents drawn up," he says.

You may not see returns for years

Assuming you invest in a startup that stays afloat and makes a profit, it could be years before any of those profits come your way.

"A startup is going to need all the cash they can get. Earnings are usually plowed back into the business (for the first few years). Any return might not be for three to five years, and there is no guarantee," Coffman says.

If an investor has a particularly targeted time frame for a return of capital and a yield they'd like to earn, Coffman says they should consider investing via a loan instead. Putting a large sum in a business based on trust and the hope for dividends later has no guarantee. But making a conventional loan to the entrepreneur or startup at a market-based interest rate with a determined term can give the investor a steady income stream and a more guaranteed return of principal.

Consider that offering a 10-year loan of $10,000 at 7 percent would net a payment of $116 per month and a total of almost $4,000 in interest over the life of the loan. Coffman says such loans might be a more common way to invest in a friend's business but still recommends making it official with proper documentation and legal paperwork.

"Sometimes the loans are never repaid in these arrangements. If you really (want your money), you need to make it official," he says.

Planning an exit strategy

When you invest in an untested startup, you could be tying up your money for a while. A new business could burn through your entire investment before opening its doors, then take years before it earns a solid revenue stream, Landers says.

But even if the enterprise is successful and you start getting dividends, it could be difficult to withdraw your initial investment. Pratt says a person should be prepared to wait a minimum of five years before he or she has any access to that capital or some kind of cash flow.

"There is almost never any kind of statement that says anything about expectations from an investment or any kind of guarantees," says Pratt.

Landers says it is important to discuss a sort of "exit strategy," which would include a way to liquidate the investment. Whether it's set by time or return, he says there should be a plan laid out for how to sell off your stake in the business. Unlike a public company that trades on the open market, you can't sell your stock in a private corporation with the click of a mouse.

"You have to ask yourself how you're going to get the money back out. (Buying in) is one thing, but getting your equity out is another," Landers says. "You want to understand the exit strategy. There really should be a plan in place by the owner to address it."

You'll need to do your homework

Landers says you'll want to know the background of everyone involved in the management of the business and have an understanding of the industry and competition. You should request a full written business plan complete with a business description, marketing plan, financial plan, market analysis and a SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats) analysis. Landers says entrepreneurs often have visions of grandeur for their business but lack the plans to truly implement them in practice.

"Every entrepreneur believes their business is going to be the best thing since sliced bread and they're going to be filthy rich. That rarely happens. Many go bankrupt," he says.

Coffman says when a startup does have a business plan, there is usually "microscopic to go on." The attention to detail, professionalism of the founders and presentation of their plan should serve as a representation for how they might operate when in business. Coffman says you should carefully analyze projections or representations made in the program of activities and use outside sources to vet it.

"They may have fantastic projections on (projected cash flows), but they usually aren't that credible," Coffman says.

Pratt recommends that potential investors consult with their CPA or a business valuation expert before making the final decision to invest.

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Tuesday, February 7, 2017

10 Reasons Why Women Moan (Or Scream) During Sex

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Do you ever wonder why women moan in bed? Women yell during sex for several different reasons according to science. Let's check out what scientists explain why women scream during sex.

According to a study by British scientists Gayle Brewer of the University of Central Lancashire and Colin Hendrie of the University of Leeds, the noises and groans that most women make when Have sex are intentional. However, what reasons lead to these sounds... before reaching orgasm?

10 Reasons Why Women Moan (Or Scream) During Sex
To clarify this point, the researchers analyzed 71 women between the ages of 18 and 48 who were heterosexual and sexually active, applying questionnaires to know more about the frequency of their orgasms and at what stage of sexual action they occurred, between other things.

They were also asked about the reasons why they moaned or shouted and the consequences of these vocalizations.

After that, the scientists managed to establish that there was no "synchrony between orgasm and the vocalization of intercourse. A fact that was backed up by the answers to the question: What percentage of time do you make noises during sex, even when you are not going to have an orgasm? Twenty-five percent of the women reported that they groaned when they had not reached the climax more than 90 percent of the time. "

Also, they discovered that there were five main reasons issued these before reaching sexual climax sounds: to accelerate the man 's ejaculation, to avoid discomfort, to avoid boredom, so as to increase the self - esteem of your partner and Not fatigue.

It is important to note that 92% of the participants were very clear that these vocalizations 'boost' the self-esteem of their partners and 87% of them recognized that they did them for this purpose.

The results show that the timing of orgasm and painting are dissociated, indicating that they are performed in part under conscious control. And are used to manipulate male behavior for the benefit of women... they recognize that what they are looking for, between Other things, with their groans is to accelerate the climax of their partner.
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